The reading pile (so far)

As I was saying on Twitter a few days ago, my reading pile is growing! 😀

In theory, it’s a bad thing – books are piling up! Oh noes! I can’t see the ceiling anymore! (metaphorically speaking) – but truth be told, the more I store away, the happier I am. I tend to think of myself as a nerdy version of Smaug: all snuggled up in my cave, billion words tucked under my wings and looking for more.

Like this, but less bling, more ink.

Anyway.

My TBR list includes:

The Wasteland, by H. Jameson

T.S. Eliot is a hollow man trapped in a dreary world. He works at a bank, a slave to the clock, the same routine, day after day. While London’s elite enjoy a Great Gatsby lifestyle and poets like Robert Frost are rock stars, attracting thousands of fans to each reading, Mr. Eliot walks past life, peering at it through cracks or around corners. Only in his imagination does the world drip with color. Then one day he comes across Jack, an out and proud gay man being badly beaten, and something compels him to intervene. Life will never be the same.

I’m almost done, and as I already mentioned somewhere, it’s a fantastic read. 😀


The Champagne Widow, by H. Fripp

France, 1805. In the sleepy town of Reims, recently widowed Nicole Clicquot is struggling to run her winemaking business alone. Her rival and owner of the largest vineyard in Champagne, calculating Monsieur Moët, is sure she’ll accept his offer of marriage. But one look at her little daughter running happily through the vines that could one day be hers, and Nicole knows she could never share her late husband’s legacy. Taking courage from the chalk soil beneath her boots, and the heat of the soft French sun, Nicole vows to save the vineyard herself by making the best champagne the world has ever tasted.

I have huge expectations for this one. Huge.

The Savage Instinct, by M.M. DeLuca

England, 1873. Clara Blackstone has just been released after one year in a private asylum for the insane. Clara has two goals: to reunite with her husband, Henry, and to never—ever—return to the asylum. As she enters Durham, Clara finds her carriage surrounded by a mob gathered to witness the imprisonment of Mary Ann Cotton—England’s first female serial killer—accused of poisoning nearly twenty people, including her husbands and children.

Clara soon finds the oppressive confinement of her marriage no less terrifying than the white-tiled walls of Hoxton. And as she grows increasingly suspicious of Henry’s intentions, her fascination with Cotton grows. Soon, Cotton is not just a notorious figure from the headlines, but an unlikely confidante, mentor—and perhaps accomplice—in Clara’s struggle to protect her money, her freedom and her life.

This is written in first POV, which is not my field of expertise, BUT. BUT.

To the North, by E.L. Grove

England, 1873. Clara Blackstone has just been released after one year in a private asylum for the insane. Clara has two goals: to reunite with her husband, Henry, and to never—ever—return to the asylum. As she enters Durham, Clara finds her carriage surrounded by a mob gathered to witness the imprisonment of Mary Ann Cotton—England’s first female serial killer—accused of poisoning nearly twenty people, including her husbands and children.

Clara soon finds the oppressive confinement of her marriage no less terrifying than the white-tiled walls of Hoxton. And as she grows increasingly suspicious of Henry’s intentions, her fascination with Cotton grows. Soon, Cotton is not just a notorious figure from the headlines, but an unlikely confidante, mentor—and perhaps accomplice—in Clara’s struggle to protect her money, her freedom and her life.

Evan has been so kind to contact us and ask us for a review of his book. What I saw intrigued me a lot 😀 Plus, it’s a duology!

Red Hail, by J. Killen

Professor Colin Ayres has spent years researching the strange story of Galina, Arizona, a sleepy border town ripped apart by violence and paranoia after the outbreak of a mysterious illness in 1960. Colin is certain the Galina Incident was simply a case of mass hysteria. But when his partner, Alonzo, starts exhibiting strange symptoms, Colin is shocked to realize they are the same as those that emerged in Galina decades ago.

As Alonzo’s condition worsens, Colin scrambles to piece together what really happened during that terrible summer in the past. He uncovers a story of murder, corruption, and fanaticism.

Horror, MM and sci-fi! I couldn’t pass it up – no way in hell.

The Newlyweds, by A. Richmonde

One marriage. One lie. Two sides to the story. The moment Vivien meets Ashton, she knows she will be his wife and absolutely nothing will stop her.

Powerful, rich and from a good family, Ashton is everything Vivien is not. So, she molds herself into Ashton’s perfect soulmate. When people begin to notice the bruises on her cheek, she holds their stares. There is no cry for help from Vivien. She simply keeps her mouth shut and lets the gossip continue.

If you saw Vivien nursing a black eye, you might be forgiven for thinking what everyone else does – that she is the victim in her marriage, but you’d be wrong.

I love some plot twist, and this one looks like it’s going to fit the bill.

Also, I grabbed a couple more (just two! Pinky promise and all) to test the, err, waters? Authors? I mean, they have great, kickass covers and I’m a sucker for those. Good covers are like, magic, but this is gonna be the subject of a rant post I’ll make in the near future.

What are you reading, gang?

One thought on “The reading pile (so far)

  1. I am reading a classic by a French writer Balzac named ‘Illusions’ and ‘flights’ by the polish nobel prize winner Tokarkzuk, both are amazing, a recommendation 🙂 happy readings this year and greetings from Portugal, PedroL

    Like

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