Deadly Vows – Keri Arthur

My latest read has been Deadly Vows, the sixth installment of the Lizzie Grace series. I'm so accustomed to the world built by Keri Arthur that being back to Lizzie and Belle's cafe felt like visiting a couple of old friends. Before telling you about this visit, let me warn you --I should write a disclaimer about this somewhere on this blog-- that all the major spoilers for this book are hidden in white text, but some minor ones might be inferred anyway. Read at your own peril.

Witch, Cat, and Cobb – J. K. Pendragon

Witch, Cat and Cobb by J. K. Pendragon --I'm guessing it is a pen name, and now I'll be forever wondering what J. K. stands for-- is the story of princess Breanwynne, destined to marry someone she doesn't and would never be able to love. Faced with the prospect of spending her whole life stuck in an unhappy marriage, she decides to run away along with Fen, a talking cat with a big secret. Together, they run to the swamp where their real adventure begins.

Trick of the Spotlight – M. L. East

When I decided to read this book, I knew close to nothing about South Korea, with two exceptions: the movie Parasite and an undiscussed and unbiased love for kimchi. The small immersion in this foreign culture made me want to discover more, because the world M.L. East described is interesting AF. After finishing my read, I'm intrigued by this unique place and I want to read more about it, so please, if you have a book or a film to suggest, drop it in the comments.

A Wolf After My Own Heart – MaryJanice Davidson

MaryJanice Davidson is one of the reasons why I love vampires so much. Shaped by Tokimeki Tonight first and completely ruined captured by Buffy the Vampire Slayer next, a quick google search was all it took me to find her amazingly funny Undead series. The world was a dark place back then, one where Amazon didn't deliver American books on my front door, so I used to buy her novels on eBay, pay ridiculously high shipping fees, and then wait for a good month before being able to read them.

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue – V. E. Schwab

Adeline LaRue is born in a small village in France at the end of the seventeenth century, where she grows up feeling that she's meant for more than living dying and being buried in the same place. She wants to be free, to be her own person, so when her family starts talking about marriage she is scared, and starts praying to the old gods. She is warned: no matter how desperate or dire, she must never pray to the gods that answer after dark. And yet she does, and this is how her real story begins.

Some Girls Bite – Chloe Neill.

When I lived with my parents, our next door neighbor was a middle aged woman with straw-colored hair. She was an avid smoker, so her apartment smelled of whatever food she was cooking along with an omnipresent, everlasting stench of stale cigarette smoke. Even the air on the landing our apartments had in common stank. Her cigarettes of choice were named Merit.

Revenge Cake – Skyler Mason

Revenge Cake gave me a lot of the same vibes of Normal People by Sally Rooney, but although I have found many similarities between Marianne and Leilani there are also a lot of differences, with the most important being that Marianne swipes through life apparently unfeeling, while Leilani is in fact terribly afraid of living and, most importantly, of failure. She is a control freak because of her anxiety, and when things escape from her tight grip, she spirals down. Hard.