The Newlyweds – Arianne Richmonde

The Newlyweds puzzles me. Like, a lot. I picked it on Netgalley, intrigued by the synopsis: a good old psychological drama, two newlyweds (hence the title) hiding things from each other, pretty straightforward yet interesting enough to make me anticipate some plot twists. It delivered, in a way, but - puzzled, as I said. Stay with me for a moment here.

Connecting you to wonderland: Japan – Takashi Sato

I love photography. Nature, architecture, interior decor, food, (period) clothes, small towns and bigass cities, you take a good picture of them and I’ll jazzhand all over it. With added pterodactyl noises too if it’s a really, really good one. TL;DR living vicariously through professional photographers is my jam. So, when I saw Connecting You to Wonderlands: Japan, by Takashi Sato, I knew I had to grab it.

72 Reasons to Be Vegan – Gene Stone, Kathy Freston

January is long gone, but reading books on veganism is one of my guilty pleasures. Despite having been plant-based for more than fourteen years now, they keep me motivated and occasionally help me find some new, interesting information. While I generally prefer reading recipe books --a decent area of my bookcase is dedicated to those, actually--, some titles, such as anything written by Jonathan Safran Foer, are simply too good to pass.

Civil War Life – Judy Sharer

I really, really like stories that take place during the 18th/19th centuries - Europe, America, Asia, it doen't matter, any location will do - and it's obvious that Judy put a lot of thought behind her characters. CWL is the third installment of A Plains Life series, but there's plenty of reference or explanations throughout the book that following along is quite easy. To be honest, I'm sorry I coulnd't read the other two before starting this one.

Max and the Spice Thieves – John Peragine

When I was 5, I had my little address book where I'd written down all the people I needed to call in case of emergency. A couple of years later, I had to cook and shop for groceries on my own. At 10, I was obsessed with translating into Italian all the Latin sentences in The Name of the Rose, and I enjoyed doing my best friend's trigonometry homework. If I try to recall memories of me as a teen, I don't think I ever acted like one. I've never been able to be my own age back then, but I sure did love kids and teen literature. Even now that I'm a grownup --sort of--, I still have a soft spot for this kind of stories, so when John Peragine asked me to read Max and the Spice Thieves, I was more than happy to accept.

Witch, Cat, and Cobb – J. K. Pendragon

Witch, Cat and Cobb by J. K. Pendragon --I'm guessing it is a pen name, and now I'll be forever wondering what J. K. stands for-- is the story of princess Breanwynne, destined to marry someone she doesn't and would never be able to love. Faced with the prospect of spending her whole life stuck in an unhappy marriage, she decides to run away along with Fen, a talking cat with a big secret. Together, they run to the swamp where their real adventure begins.